Sunday, March 09, 2014

The Boiler Room

This ↓ is Paul, the owner of Temple's Sugar Bush.


He came to our table to thank me for the photo that I printed (see below) and offered to open up the boiler room for us after we finished our meal. He had finished a new ceiling over the winter and was happy to show off his impressive handiwork. I love his lumberjack look although it is quite a departure for an ex-military guy. (I processed this to try to bring out his hardy and rugged features.)


I had printed and given them a copy of this ↑ picture which I had taken at Winterlude in downtown Ottawa several weeks ago. He mentioned that they have had this booth and another going for several years now during this winter festival.

So, into the boiler room we went, and I took a number of shots. I had been in there before, but not with the new ceiling and not without many other customers milling about.

I don't think I need to say any more, so I will just present the photos. I really like some of the b&w versions, but also present the colour counterparts in most cases.





I prefer the colour version of this next pair.



A few from floor level. The final one didn't seem to translate well to b&w, so I didn't bother.




Okay, one more: I don't love this ↓ photo, but I do think it's interesting how the ceiling reflected in the pipe.


It was a nice opportunity to click the camera.

14 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

wow! it is really beautiful! the ceiling and the reflections and colors are just wonderful! what a great guy to give you a tour!

TexWisGirl said...

and i do really like the photo you gave him!

Regenia said...

The photograph you gave him was WONDERFUL!

Tabor said...

You are quite the photographer. Did you do this as an HDR or something else?

Anvilcloud said...

Some were HDR.

Hilary said...

You've created some fine photography here, AC. I do love the photo you gave to him.. the colours are so vibrant. And the reflection in the pipe is interesting.. it makes it look like a wood pipe. It's interesting how the grain followed the pipe direction. You'd think some of it would go against the flow but it doesn't.

Gina said...

Yes, the red ladder really made the difference in that one picture, didn't it?

Linda Braun said...

Actually, I really liked the final photo of the pipe and its reflections. Great HDR photos and what marvelous craftsmanship in the creation of that room. Some day I'm going to have to invest in a digital SRL camera instead of my point and shoot. Love your HDR shots when you share them.

Beatrice P. Boyd said...

Quite an amazing place, John, in color and B&W and nice to get a tour for giving away a photo. Surprises are always best when unexpected.

Pearl said...

wow, quite the scale of operation compared to what granddad did in the dry laid stone sugar shack.

The Chicken's Consigliere said...

Wow-that's so cool. I love the photo you took of him, too.

Mary Gilmour said...

Wow! The camp sure has changed since the last time I saw it. Great pipe photos, camera ace. If you ever get a chance, go to a winery and try the same technique on the stainless steel vats. I got some dandy shots.

The first year that we sold maple products on the canal was, I think, 1988 (or 87?) and Temples did the base setup while other members of the syrup association helped. We had to park way, way off and hand carry the syrup down onto the ice. Things sure have changed.

Samuel said...

Photos aside, that is one amazing boiler room! I think the black and white photos add something to it, a sort of antiquity. Makes it look like a scary place! But the one with the ladder in does look better in colour. Very unusual, yet amazing photographs you have posted.

Samuel @ JS Gas & Property Services

Wilfred Andrews said...

Wow, that is one impressive boiler room! I can just about cope with my small boiler at home, and when it decided to break down just before Christmas I cold have cried. Luckily it was fixed quickly and professionally by my local firm of plumbers. Thankfully it didn't cost me too much.

Wilfred Andrews @ LB Plumbing and Heating