Tuesday, March 13, 2007

Introversion, Addendum

Just a few brief additional thoughts to yesterday's post.

It's interesting to delve into personality types, isn't it? I have actually requested that the library reserve a copy of Laney's The Introvert Advantage for me. I don't expect it to appear anytime soon, for I'm 40th in line, but there is more than one copy in circulation, so it might not be too long either.

One thing that I didn't mention in the previous post about introversion was that they claimed that this was something that is hard-wired into us. It has to do with the construction of the brain, as I understand it. I had always thought that these sorts of things had more to do with nurture than nature, but it seems that I was wrong. I would think it likely, however, that nurture could certainly modify one's degree of introversion — or any other personality trait for that matter.

When I ponder my days of teaching and how much I enjoyed teaching English, I can see how personality may have come into play. Whether you discuss Shakespeare or a novel or a poem, there is always room for interpretation and the sharing of thoughts and ideas. As an introvert, I was quite happy to hear what the kids thought of this or that, and, as most of them were extroverts (apparently), I'm sure that many of them were pleased with the opportunity to voice their opinions. My other subject, geography, was more of a tell it type of subject, so it was probably less of a natural fit for both teacher and many students.

9 comments:

Norma said...

We are born with our personalities, just like eye color and body shape. You can work with it, or around it, or even through it, but you'd better be a good actor if you're going convince people you're an extrovert when you're not. I think there is a period during the teen years when many try to do the extrovertish stuff, however.

I think in the past too many in the helping/teaching professions have treated introversion as a type of pathological condition that needed to be changed.

Pam said...

Either you is or you ain't. I is.

Bonita said...

Yes, hard-wired is a good term. Nature and disposition are also...so you could be a grumpy introvert or a blissful one. I'm of the latter.

Cathy said...

Ah, yes. I can see where being introverted would be an asset in teaching English.

AC, the older I get, the more convinced I am that we've not got as much free will as we thought we did. Now certainly, as you say, nurture can affect us - the "as the twig as bent so grows the tree" thing. But, I now know - the tree will still be apple, oak or pine - no amount of bending will change that.

Coll said...

I suppose recognition and acceptance are probably a pair of the tools needed to tweek some of those hard-wires.

Valerie - Riding Solo said...

I am all caught up now and I love the porceilin photo, the smuge thougts and the Marchless march..LOL

I will get those out to you shortly kind friend. Wild things going on here.

Dee said...

I think It is a both. I do think we are born what we are but nuturing can either help us grow in the right direction. Another excellant post, I might add.

Tossing Pebbles in the Stream said...

After hearing the radio program on CBC that you did, I decided I was more of an introvert that I thought previously. I had always wished my house would be a gathering place for friends and family, a beehive of activity. It never has been. My personality probably limits such activitiy. As much as I enjoy short visits I am releaved when they leave.

Another thing. I am uncomfortable in large groups that require chit-chat. I don't drink so I don't even have that to depress my inhibitions. As a clergyman, I am only comfortable in groups when I am in charge. Taking charge decreases my anxiety. I imagine, "being the teacher" is a context that makes it easier for Introvert to deal with a group.

methatiam said...

I think I disagree with the hard-wired concept. I think nurture and circumstance play bigger roles than genetics.