Monday, February 27, 2006

Quintessential Canadiana

snowmobilers

I thought that I would share these two photos with you as I deem them to be quintessentially Canadian. Last week, I met the above snowmobilers at a gas station which is located in a little village about ten minutes from the cottage. They consented to have their pictures taken. Back to the left, just out of view, is a 40k snowmobile trail that leads to another little village. In reality, however, they can travel far and wide by roadsides and over frozen lakes. Although I meant to, I didn't get a picture of these roadside routes. They come complete with miniature traffic signs, stop signs most frequently, but I've spotted yield signs as well.


Then, on the way home the other day, we stopped at a rural coffee shop. For you Canadians, it's a Tims. It's in the middle of nowhere really, but whenever we go by, there are always lots of customers, both inside and going through the drive-through. It's about all there is for about an hour and a half east and an hour west, and there isn't much north or south either. So, I guess that loads of people stop here on their way by. When we emerged, having filled our bellies with a chicken club sandwich and having filled our extra large travel mugs with coffee, double cream, I noticed these two logging trucks and another parked on the road. The pickup truck in front of the logging trucks had two snowmobiles on the back.


It seemed an opportunity to share some winter Canadiana with you. When I opined above that this was quintessential Canadiana, of course it isn't totally true; it's just part of what makes us distinctive. For most Canadians, logging trucks and snowmobiles parked at a gas station are not everyday occurrences. Far, far from it. Having said that, you sure don't have to go very far into the hinterland to see such sights.


logging trucks

 

10 comments:

megz_mum said...

Enjoyed seeing your photos.I have to say though that I can't help but cringe a bit when I see logging trucks, and inwardly HAVE to ask the questions "renewable timber? plantation timber? old growth never to be seen again trees?"
Still, it is a part of life, so must assume the best.

Norma said...

An interesting post as usual. Your photos are always terrific. When we watch Canadian TV it seems the diversity (in the older, before-PC meaning of the word) is even beyond what we have in the US.

Today I'm doing "Monday Memories" on saving old cards and letters (which often we don't do with e-mail and blogging). You and Cuppa would be a great addition to the MM group.

-epm said...

Living in New England, at approximately the same latitude as Toronto, I find your pictures and posts to be very similar to my experiences in the northern New England triad of Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine... particularly Maine. The logging trucks nearly overflowing with timber gassing up at truck stops, or barreling down the highway -- often at speeds that turn my knuckles white as they pass. And the long stretches of rippled tracks of snow paralleling the highway, indicating that long distance travel in the winter is not to sole domain of the automobile.

Ah. A long winter drive through the country with a big mug of coffee, a toasty car and a loving travel companion.... Now that's livin', eh? :)

Turtle Guy said...

Fabulous, as always! I sometimes question my Canadian spirit only because although I firmly believe in Tim Hortons as a corporate entity, I believe I've found better coffee in Kicking Horse - from Cranbrook of all places! True, Kicking Horse coffe is available in the supermarket, not on the roadside, so Tim's is a delightful convenience. I also think very highly of their Children's Camp Programmes. My company does sond and video production for the Charity Golf Tournament at the Kananaskis camp every September. I think every charity who wants to raise good money should take a page from Tim's book on raising charitable funds. They do it up right. They treat their volunteers like platnum and pamper the folks who drop their hard-earned dollars for the cause.

Bonita said...

Montanans also frequent the truck stops on their way up to ski slopes. The logging trucks stop too, for refueling, and for the coffee. It's a 'Truck Stop Cafe' that stays open 24 - 7.

Sarah Elaine said...

Great photos!

Tim's rules. Though I Kicking Horse is good, too.

PBS said...

Those photos look just like the area where I used to live. Must be sister cities, or states, or something....!

Simply Coll said...

My hubby is an avid snowmobiler and often goes on long excrusions with his buddies. They love it. Me.. I prefer to stay warm and toasty at home.

inez said...

Your first photo - Woods, looks like it could have been taken on Hwy 41/132 from kaladar to Renfrew. And that Timmie's sounds like the one on #7 north of Madoc.

Anvilcloud said...

Very goog Inez. Spot on with Tims and close on the other. It's in Coe Hill (south of Bancroft).