Saturday, January 28, 2006

No Citrus Groves Yet

Considering the previous post, this seems timely.


Temperatures in southern Ontario approached ten degrees celsius again today. Canadians can get a little goofy when things like this happen, and we actually saw a few kids out in shirtsleeves when we went for a afternoon stroll. While we are tempted to think that this might be a result of global warming, it's really just a freaky winter as a result of the polar vortex spending all of its time in Russia. It seems that this brings them something approaching unprecedented cold and us an unusually mild winter as these excerpts from this article in The Globe and Mail point out.


Laymen may be tempted to attribute the phenomenon to global warming, but if climate change was as rapid as all that, Canadians would be planting citrus groves in five years and living in deserts within a few generations. "This may be a dry run, a dress rehearsal, of what winters might be like in the future," Mr. Phillips said. "But we can't say that this is the beginning of the permanent change."


... the climatologist blames "a total absence of cold air" for the relative warmth. His explanation may seem a no-brainer, but the details are elaborate.


... Usually, the vortex lingers somewhere for a while and then moves around of its own accord, its shifts causing other fluctuations of warm and cold air masses. Yet this year, "day after day, week after week, month after month now, this cold pole is just not coming over to this part of the world," Mr. Phillips said.


The vortex's failure to move has allowed warmer air to come into Canada -- and stay.


Meanwhile, here's sundown through our bedroom window on this fine day.



 

12 comments:

Gina said...

The word vortex always sound ominous to me, no matter what the context.

In the meantime, enjoy! Perhaps a bit of cycling?

Matt said...

I love sunsets. :)

mreddie said...

No citrus grove yet but my nephew-in-law's brother grows bananas - mostly in and out of a greenhouse. Not an easy task since they only grow normally in the tropics. ec

Simply Coll said...

I must admit to feeling a little relieved on reading your post. As much as I am enjoying this mild winter.. I was begining to wonder about the why of it all.
My condolences to those living in Europe with the continuous cold.

Dee said...

I think this kind of weather comes in cycles. I thought this was the warmest winter here but they said one back in 1889 was warmer.

PBS said...

Well, it's good to know that it's not from global warming. That's a pretty sunset. We've had record warm weather here, too.

Bonita said...

I love to see photos of sunshine through curtains. Oh, the craving of light in wintertime. This was refreshing and wonderful.

Sue said...

It's probably up to about 15C here but we think of it as cold! I'm reminded of several years back when we were in the UK at Christmas, and the temp was -2C, literally freezing, and we couldn't believe how cold it was. It's rare to be below freezing in the daytime there. Then we received an email from friends in Northern Canada, telling us they were having a 'heatwave'... it was -2C!!

At 10C I'm shivering in sweatshirt, sweater AND warm fleece with thick trousers.

Pearl said...

Pretty window photo. I agree. It's a little too early to even say global warming exists and a warm day out of fierce cold does not a tropical oasis make.

Darlene said...

What a serene feeling this picture evokes. You wouldn't believe how our temperature keeps going up and down and up and down, like a yo-yo, here in St. Paul, MN. In 20's one day, the next nearly 40, the following day nearly 50, then suddenly it's back to 30 degrees. Weird!And that keeps happening, from week to week.

Sarah Elaine said...

Wasn't there an aricle in the Globe and Mail in December saying it would be one of the coldest winters ever? Hhhmmm...

Well, regardless, I'm happy about not having to plug in my car.

colleen said...

You Canadians are hearty folk. Love the title and the photo! I'm here via Simply Coll.